St. Thomas promotes Pride Month, contradicting its own Catholic teaching

The university’s diversity and inclusion office recently published information on “the importance of pronouns," providing a list that explains how to pronounce “gender-neutral” pronouns like “ze,” “zirs,” and “xe.”

University of St. Thomas/Instagram

The University of St. Thomas, a private Catholic university in Minnesota, promoted “Pride Month” in recent emails and social media posts.

“This June is LGBTQIA+ Pride Month, and St. Thomas celebrates and supports our community members this month and year-round,” an email from the University of St. Thomas Newsroom says.

Screenshot of a June 2 email from the University of St. Thomas.

The university’s Student Diversity and Inclusion Services (SDIS) office posted that it is “excited to celebrate all of our LGBTQIA2S+ community members,” along with background information on the history of Pride Month.

“SDIS is proud to support, advocate, and stand in solidarity with our LGBTQIA2S+ students, staff, and faculty,” the group’s Instagram post reads, saying SDIS will be hosting Pride events on campus.

The university itself also posted a photo of a Pride/transgender flag, with a caption wishing students a “Happy #Pride Month!”

Screenshot of a University of St. Thomas Instagram post

The university’s SDIS office recently published information on “the importance of pronouns” and provided a list that explains how to pronounce “gender-neutral” pronouns like “ze,” “zirs,” and “xe.”

This content directly contradicts the Catholic Church’s teaching.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church says that “under no circumstances can [homosexual relations] be approved” and calls these relations “contrary to the natural law.” The “psychological genesis” of homosexuality has not been explained, the Catholic Church says, and homosexual individuals should practice chastity.

The Catechism further describes homosexual acts as “intrinsically disordered” and closed “to the gift of life.”

The founding of St. Thomas “was inspired by Catholic intellectual tradition,” according to the university’s website, which says the school is committed to “the pursuit of truth.”