MN GOP Congressman Tried to Rally Support for Failed AHCA

One Minnesota Congressman tried to rally the troops in a last-ditch effort to save the AHCA from its demise.

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President Barack Obama delivers a health care address to a joint session of Congress at the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., Sept. 9, 2009. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

WASHINGTON — In a stunning move, Speaker Paul Ryan (WI-01) moved for a recess and pulled the American Health Care Act (AHCA) from the floor of the House. Ryan who held a press conference shortly after said the bill did not have enough votes.

Reports out of Washington in the past few days indicated many Republicans would not vote for the Republican replacement to Obamacare.

The bill has received criticism since its introduction by members of both parties as worsening the situation for Americans.

Republican congressmen from Minnesota were expected to vote in favor of the Republican replacement. Earlier in March, Rep. Erik Paulsen released a statement acknowledging his support of the replacement plan. “After many years and countless stories of patients facing skyrocketing premiums, losing their health care plan, and not being able to see their doctor, we are replacing Obamacare with a plan that will lower costs and give patients immediate relief,” Paulsen said. Paulsen voted in committee to advance the legislation ultimately pulled.

In a last ditch effort to rally supporters, Rep. Jason Lewis stood on the House floor urging lawmakers to join him in voting for the AHCA. Lewis, in his speech referenced skyrocketing deductibles and rising premiums in Minnesota. “That’s what you’re trying to preserve?” Lewis said.

While Rep. Tom Emmer’s office did not return our request for comment in time for publication, a Kare 11 report states Emmer would wait for a final version of the bill before making a decision.

In the past, all three congressmen have expressed their support for a replacement of Obamacare, which has hit Minnesota hard in premium increases.

The future of a republican replacement is up in the air as President Donald Trump made it clear Thursday night, if a vote did not happen Friday, Obamacare would remain in place.