Democrats Buy $6.8 Million Of TV Ads For Just 2 Minnesota Districts

Despite this infusion of cash, the Chairman of the Minnesota Democrats says his party "just can’t keep up" with the Trump campaign.

The Democrat’s House Majority PAC announced that it will pump $6,800,000 of TV ads into just two swing districts during the November elections.

The two Minneapolis districts the Democrats have targeted flipped blue during the 2018 midterms. This political marketing campaign is part of a nationwide $51,000,000 effort to flood media markets with liberal messaging.

Democrats also plan to spend over a quarter million dollars in ads in Minnesota’s first congressional district that Republican Jim Hagedorn narrowly won in 2018, according to the Star Tribune.

Representative Jim Hagedorn beat Democrat Dan Feehan by less than 1% in 2018, securing his first term in Congress.

The Democratic national committee plans to spend an additional $22 million on YouTube ads, some of which will appear in Minnesota, reports The Hill. This form of internet advertising has drawn controversy during the current election cycle as tech moguls grapple with their proper role in democracy.

YouTube admitted to censoring President Donald Trump’s campaign ads while Twitter has stopped allowing paid campaign content entirely.

Republicans have also announced their intention to spend a considerably smaller amount of money in Minnesota. The GOP-backing Congressional Leadership Fund says it will spend $3.35 million in the land of 10,000 lakes ahead of the 2020 elections, accoridng to the Tribune.

Trump’s campaign intends to flip Minnesota red this year in the presidential election, an outcome that hasn’t been seen since 1972 when the state supported former President Richard Nixon. Thus far, the president’s efforts have appeared successful.

Trump’s campaign is “staffing up in Minnesota in ways we’ve never seen before, and frankly we just can’t keep up,” Ken Martin, the Chairman of the Minnesota Democratic Party said back in October, reports the Pioneer Press.

The re-election effort doesn’t seem to have lost any steam since then. Even amidst the COVID-19 epidemic, volunteers have logged record amounts of voter engagement.