Minneapolis tells police ‘when you are off duty, go home and stay home’

Minneapolis appears to have extra strict standards for its police officers when it comes to coronavirus prevention.

Image from Minneapolis Police Department Facebook page.

The Minneapolis Police Department (MPD) wants its cops to follow the same coronavirus-related rules that apply to the rest of the city — plus a few more.

“Social distancing applies to cops too!” reads a series of fliers posted throughout all police precinct buildings in Minneapolis. Alpha News obtained a photograph of the new guidance via an individual who works in law enforcement.

The rules for cops include directives to “not sit together in groups of any size,” avoid congregating in “roll call rooms, break areas, meeting spaces, lockers rooms” or anywhere else, refrain from holding any in-person meetings and more.

The most emphasized rule is written in bold typeface and directs officers to “go home and stay home” when off duty. This rule seems to persist for police officers even though Minnesota’s general “stay-at-home-order” expired in May.

This filer has appeared in all Minneapolis police precincts, according to somebody who works in law enforcement.

“All of these measures will help assure you protect yourself, your partners, your family, and the public we serve,” the flier concludes.

Minneapolis police have also donned face masks since early April, per KTSP.

“While mask and face coverings are not a standard part of the MPD uniform, and some may find it uncomfortable engaging with an officer wearing a mask, I ask for your understanding during these unprecedented times,” MPD Chief Medaria Arradondo said in April about his officers wearing masks. “This is just one way we are working together to help slow down the spread of the coronavirus.”

Meanwhile, the CDC advises that “for law enforcement personnel performing daily routine activities, the immediate health risk [posed by coronavirus] is considered low.” Despite this, there have been 101 coronavirus-related deaths of police officers in the U.S. so far this year, according to the Officer Down Memorial Page.

None of these deaths have occurred in Minnesota.