Court documents say Buffalo shooting suspect previously made threats of ‘mass violence’

Disturbing details contained in a no-contact order issued against Ulrich in 2018 reveal that he was accused of making threats to commit “mass violence at medical clinics and hospitals.”

Wright County Sheriff Sean Deringer speaks with the media Tuesday. (Wright County/YouTube)

One person is dead and several others were injured in a mass shooting at a Minnesota clinic on Tuesday, and disturbing details have emerged about prior threats made by the suspect who had previously been ordered to surrender any weapons.

Gregory Paul Ulrich/Wright County Sheriff’s Office.

Law enforcement officials have identified Gregory Paul Ulrich, 67, as the suspect in a shooting that took place at an Allina Health clinic in Buffalo just before 11 a.m. Tuesday. Ulrich was taken into custody at the scene shortly after law enforcement arrived at the clinic.

Five people were injured in the gunfire, and it was reported late Tuesday that one of the five victims had died from their injuries. The person who died has not been officially identified yet, but a friend of the victim has publicly identified her as 37-year-old Lindsay Overbay, a nurse at the clinic.

Disturbing details contained in a no-contact order issued against Ulrich in 2018 reveal that he was accused of making threats to commit “mass violence at medical clinics and hospitals.”

A partial image of the document granting the no-contact order was posted online by an MPR reporter on Wednesday morning. The document shows that Ulrich denied the allegations in the petition but did not object to the restraining order being issued.

The order states that Ulrich had made harassing phone calls to the petitioner, listed as Andrew John Burgdorf. The clinic directory lists Dr. Andrew J. Burgdorf as a family medicine practitioner at the Buffalo clinic.

Details in the order allege that Ulrich told the petitioner that he had practiced different scenarios and was testing how to get through security to “achieve his goal.”

Prior to the court order barring Ulrich from having contact with the doctor, charges against Ulrich for violating a temporary restraining order had been dismissed by a judge, who cited Ulrich’s inability to stand trial because he was deemed mentally incompetent, Fox 9 reported.

A former roommate of Ulrich’s, Raymond Zandstra, told Fox 9 that he previously saw a letter granting Ulrich a permit to carry a weapon. However, questions remain about whether a permit was actually issued to Ulrich since Minnesota permit to carry data is not public information.

Fox 9 said the court documents related to Ulrich’s charge of violating the temporary restraining order indicate that he had applied for a permit to purchase a firearm but it was not approved.

At the time the no-contact order was issued, Ulrich was ordered to turn in any weapons or permits to carry, the report said.

Ulrich remains in custody and charges of murder, attempted murder and possession of an explosive or incendiary device are expected to be filed shortly, according to a statement released Wednesday by Wright County Attorney Brian Lutes.

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