CDC says COVID-19 can be airborne

"CDC’s recommendations remain the same based on existing science and after a thorough technical review of the guidance."

CDC/Unsplash

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has changed its guidelines on COVID-19 to state that the virus can be airborne, although that is not the most common form of transmission.

As recently as Sept. 25, news organizations had reported the CDC had “no proof” of COVID-19 being airborne. However, after long debates as to whether COVID-19 is airborne, the CDC changed its guidelines Monday to rule that the virus can be spread through the air.

“CDC continues to believe, based on current science, that people are more likely to become infected the longer and closer they are to a person with COVID-19. Today’s update acknowledges the existence of some published reports showing limited, uncommon circumstances where people with COVID-19 infected others who were more than 6 feet away or shortly after the COVID-19-positive person left an area,” reads a statement from the CDC. “In these instances, transmission occurred in poorly ventilated and enclosed spaces that often involved activities that caused heavier breathing, like singing or exercise. Such environments and activities may contribute to the buildup of virus-carrying particles.” 

“CDC’s recommendations remain the same based on existing science and after a thorough technical review of the guidance,” says the CDC. 

Last month, the CDC backtracked on its released guidelines that said COVID-19 was airborne, though it never let go of that theory.

The World Health Organization has not updated its recommendations, though it has previously worked with researchers on the subject, and acknowledged that airborne transmission “may happen.”

“Bottom line is this: there’s much more aerosol than we thought,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, a member of the White House’s coronavirus task force.