Armed ‘Career Criminal’ Sentenced to Over 20 Years on Federal Gun Charge

A Twin Cities man with a history of violent crimes has been sentenced to over two decades in federal prison under the Armed Career Criminal Act after being found guilty by a jury last fall.

Norris Deshon Andrews.

A Twin Cities man with a history of violent crimes has been sentenced to over two decades in federal prison under the Armed Career Criminal Act after being found guilty by a jury last fall.

Norris Deshon Andrews, 35, has over two dozen state level convictions in Minnesota stretching back to the mid-2000s including at least a dozen felonies. 

Andrews received stayed sentences on his first two felony convictions in separate cases for auto theft a month apart at the age of 19. Less than six months later he would be charged with four new felonies in two new cases including controlled substance and auto theft.

Andrews would go on to be convicted over the years on second-, third-, fourth- and fifth-degree assault, second-degree burglary, fleeing police and felon in possession of a firearm, as well as numerous convictions for driving after revocation. All but one of the convictions were in Hennepin County.

Andrews was charged in federal court in 2018 with felon in possession of a firearm following an incident in May of that year when two people were shot and wounded in a parking lot on Plymouth Avenue North in Minneapolis. Surveillance footage from nearby cameras revealed Andrews as the shooter, according to court records.

 

Federal officials charged Andrews under the Armed Career Criminal Act that allows for sentence enhancements for felons who commit crimes with firearms if they are previously convicted of certain violent crimes three or more times. The indictment in the case referenced Andrews’ often violent felony history as grounds for the indictment under the act.

Andrews was convicted by a federal jury in October and was sentenced this week to 262 months in prison and five years of supervised parole after release.

Unlike state-level sentencing in Minnesota which only requires offenders to serve two-thirds of their sentence incarcerated, those sentenced under federal guidelines can usually only earn a 15 percent reduction in their sentence through “good-time credit.” Andrews will serve at least 18 years in prison as a result of the conviction.

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Minnesota Crime Watch & Information publishes news, info and commentary about crime, public safety and livability issues in Minneapolis, the Twin Cities and greater Minnesota.