Viral Video Explains Need for Reform of MN’s Met Council

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MINNEAPOLIS, MN — Minnesota’s Met Council has been put on notice by one prominent Minnesota Republican.

Hennepin County Commissioner and former candidate for Governor Jeff Johnson released a video calling for a reformation in the Met Council.

In the four-minute video, which has garnered 20,000 views on Facebook, Johnson explains what the Met Council is and why change is needed.

Johnson cites a study done by Minneapolis-based Katana Consulting to give perspective on the size of the Met Council.

The study uncovered that the council is the largest and most expensive regional authority in the country eclipsing cities like Atlanta, Los Angeles, Sacramento, and Washington D.C.

Currently, the council has an operating budget of $1B and a capital budget of $8B.

Johnson describes the initial creation of the council as a means to “coordinate the sewer infrastructure and a metro-wide bus system in the Twin-Cities.”

The Met Council describes its purpose as a “regional policy-making body, planning agency, and provider of essential services for the Twin Cities metropolitan region. The Council’s mission is to foster efficient and economic growth for a prosperous region…providing essential services and infrastructure – Metro Transit’s bus and rail system, Metro Mobility, Transit Link, wastewater treatment services, regional parks, planning, affordable housing, and more – that support communities and businesses and ensure a high quality of life for residents.”

At the end of the video, Johnson states the council should exist, but after being rebuilt from scratch.

Johnson refers to several examples of the overreach of the Met Council in the video to back up his assessment. This includes the council’s $80 million tax levy, its initiative to put more people of color in parks, to move more individuals in poverty to wealthier areas, and the lack of elected positions within the council.

Overall, Johnson’s message of a reformed council found praise with those who watched the video on Facebook. The video has been shared 397 times on Facebook.

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